9 August 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Councillor/Sir/Madam

 

You are invited to attend an ABORIGINAL CONSULTATIVE COMMITTEE of Ashfield Council, to be held on Level 6, Civic Centre, 260 Liverpool Road, Ashfield on THURSDAY  16 AUGUST 2012 at 4:30 PM.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

SEE ATTACHED AGENDA


 

Aboriginal Consultative Committee - 16 August 2012

 

AGENDA

 

1.               Opening

 

2.               Acknowledgement of Local Indigenous Community

 

3.               Apologies/Request for Leave of Absence

                   

4.               Disclosures Of Interest

 

Disclosures to be made by any Committee members who have a pecuniary / non-pecuniary interest in respect of matters that are before the Committee at this meeting.

(16/08/2012)

 

5.               Confirmation of Minutes of Committee

 

Aboriginal Consultative Committee - 21/06/2012

 

6.               Staff Reports

 

6.1        Aboriginal Cultural Awareness Booklet and Recognition of the Aboriginal Community Policy

 

6.2        2012 NAIDOC Celebrations

 

6.3        Building the Sister Community relationship with the Peak Hill Aboriginal Community Working Party

 

 

7.               General Business

 

 

 

8.               Close

 

 

 

 

 


Ashfield Council – Report to Aboriginal Consultative Committee held on Thursday 16 August 2012                                                                                                                                                  ACC6.1

Subject                            ABORIGINAL CULTURAL AWARENESS BOOKLET AND RECOGNITION OF THE ABORIGINAL COMMUNITY POLICY

 

File Ref                            Community Services

 

Prepared by                   Anthia Hart - Community Development Worker - Arts, Culture & Recreation       

 

 

Reasons                          To progress matters carried forward from 12 June 2012 Aboriginal Advisory Committee meeting

 

Objective                         That the Committee provide feedback regarding these matters

 

 

 


Overview of Report

The purpose of this report is to bring to the attention of the Committee, matters carried forward from the 21 June 2012 meeting.  These are the draft Aboriginal Awareness Booklet, the draft Aboriginal Community policy and the wording for a plaque commemorating Aboriginal people.

 

 

 

Background

 

Draft ‘Recognition of the Aboriginal Community Policy’

The draft ‘Recognition of the Aboriginal Community Policy’ (attached) provides guidelines for the formal recognition of the Aboriginal community that includes the importance of recognition for the Aboriginal, traditional owners of the land and for the formal procedure to be used in affording recognition to the traditional owners in Ashfield Council activities.

 

Draft ‘Recognition of the Aboriginal Community’ booklet

The purpose of the draft booklet ‘Recognition of the Aboriginal Community’ (attached) is to enable culturally sensitive dialogue with the Aboriginal community within the Ashfield Local Government Area. 

 

The booklet describes concepts and definitions, cultural protocols and requirements, ownership, copyright, cultural and intellectual property information and more. 

 

Plaque commemorating Aboriginal people

Action 12 of Councils Reconciliation Action Plan states:

 

Plaque commemorating the original Aboriginal peoples who occupied the land, installed in prominent position within the Municipality.


 

The following is the information that was provided to the Committee in February 2012:

As a guide, the cost of a bronze plaque 45cm x 35cm would be around $1500 plus GST and plus or minus 20%.It is difficult for a company to estimate a price as it is highly reliant on the amount of text, whether there are logos incorporated into the design, the size of the text and the type of finish that is required. A standard finish would be a dark oxidized finish.

This price would be supply only, with concealed fixing pins on the rear. Apparently these are not difficult to install for a handyman / tradesman. A selected company is likely to have one of their graphic designers prepare the artwork so that a suitable layout and text is achieved. Manufacturing takes approximately 15 working days.

Council has an experienced stonemason as a long term member of staff who could build a stone plinth for the plaque to be placed upon.

Naturally, the wording of a plaque will be critical and something the Committee needs to determine. As an example, a plaque commemorating the Aboriginal Heritage of Manly reads in part:

This plaque acknowledges that Australia’s Indigenous Peoples, in particular the Cannalgal and Kayimai clans, were the custodians of this area long before it came to be known as Manly. The Cannalgal and Kayimai people were custodians of the land, and all the sacred and secret sacred sites that were bequeathed to them by Baiame, the all powerful being who created men and women and their world.

Aboriginal culture is rich and varied. It is a proud and intrinsic part of Australia’s heritage. To all Aboriginal peoples, the earth is the mother of all things. It is therefore the base of the kinship system which binds all people, plants, animals, birds, land and water into one huge family. The image on the plaque represents this relationship.

A second example, featured below, is from the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Pymble:

 

 

 

Financial Implications

The final determination on the matter of the plaque is likely to carry financial implications for Council

 

Other Staff Comments

 

 

Public Consultation

Consultation via the Aboriginal Advisory Committee

 

Conclusion

To progress the ‘Recognition of the Aboriginal Community’ policy and the ‘Aboriginal Cultural Awareness Booklet’, feedback from the Committee would be helpful to produce documents that are significant to the Ashfield Local Government Area.

 

ATTACHMENTS

Attachment 1View

Draft Recognition of the Aboriginal Community policy

6 Pages

 

Attachment 2View

Draft Aboriginal Cultural Awareness Booklet

15 Pages

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

1/3    That the Committee advise on appropriate wording for the commemorative plaque as described

 

2/3    That the Committee provide feedback on the draft resource document ‘Recognition of the Aboriginal Community’ previously circulated and included as an attachment to this report

 

3/3    That the Committee provide feedback on the draft policy document ‘Aboriginal Cultural Protocols’ contained as an attachment to this report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nellette Kettle

Director Corporate & Community Services

 

 

 

 


Attachment 1

 

Draft Recognition of the Aboriginal Community policy

 







Attachment 2

 

Draft Aboriginal Cultural Awareness Booklet

 
















Ashfield Council – Report to Aboriginal Consultative Committee held on Thursday 16 August 2012                                                                                                                                                  ACC6.2

Subject                            2012 NAIDOC CELEBRATIONS

 

File Ref                            Community Services

 

Prepared by                   Anthia Hart - Community Development Worker - Arts, Culture & Recreation       

 

 

Reasons                          To update the Committee on NAIDOC Celebrations

 

Objective                         To update the Committee on NAIDOC Week activities and the official naming of the Civic Centre activity rooms

 

 

 


Overview of Report


The purpose of this report is to provide to the Committee an update of matters relating to the celebration of 2012 NAIDOC in the Ashfield Council area and the official naming of the Civic Centre activity rooms.

 

 

 

Background

 

NAIDOC WEEK

Each year in the first week of July, Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians join together to recognize the valuable contribution Indigenous people make to Australia’s national identity.

                                                                           

This year, Council delivered a range of activities during the week that included:

 

1.      Dreaming Story-time and craft activity with Patricia Blackman for 2-5 year olds, held in the Library.  The children painted murals to describe the stories that were told. 

 

2.      Dharug woman and fashion and textile designer Robyn Caughlan visited Ashfield to speak about her memoir 'Waiting at the Gate'.  At the age of five, after years of abuse, and just months after the death of her father, Robyn was sent on a 'holiday' and was never returned to her family. She waited at the gate for her mother to return but it soon dawned on her that her family was not coming to get her.

         

          From humble and sometimes horrific beginnings Robyn became one of Australia's leading fashion and textile designers and an accomplished artist. In Waiting at the Gate Robyn transforms her life in front of the reader's eyes and comes back from the brink of suicide to build a happy and successful life.

3.      An art activity for 5-7 year olds was held in the NTK Gallery.

4.      The official opening and naming of the Civic Centre Activity Rooms and launch of the Brown Street mural was a memorable occasion for all who attended.  A colourful smoking ceremony was performed in the Civic Square by Terry, who was accompanied by Les on didgeridoo.

The plaques for the rooms and the mural were unveiled by the Governor of New South Wales, Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC CV.  These rooms will bring people together through art and craft, cultural practice, music, education and training workshops and school holiday programs.

 

                       

 

In late 2011, Ashfield Council commissioned Aboriginal artist, Danny Eastwood to create a mural for the facade of the Brown Street car park.  The mural that is now installed, displays traditional Aboriginal lifestyle and design features that depict the rich Aboriginal heritage of the area.  Danny Eastwood is a descendant of the Ngemba Tribe of Western New South Wales on his mother’s side.  Danny was New South Wales Aboriginal Artist of the Year in 1992, and in 1993 he won the National Aboriginal Artist of the Year award.  Danny’s art can be found in major collections such as the Australian Maritime Museum in Sydney and Heritage Centre in Parramatta.  Whilst working on the Brown Street car park mural, ABC Message Stick filmed Danny at his work and the crew also filmed the launch of the mural and the activity room opening.  Message Stick is a TV program about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander lifestyles, culture and issues and allows Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to tell their stories in their own way. 

 

 

5.      For the third year in a row, Council provided a free bus trip to Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park during NAIDOC Week.  This outing is very popular with the community and quickly booked out when advertised.  32 people travelled to Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park to experience Aboriginal bush knowledge and survival skills.  The attached article written by Ms Deborah Lennis gives a detailed narrative of the outing and it is clear from this article why the outing is so popular.  (See attachment)

 

6.      Throughout the week, Aboriginal items and artifacts were displayed on the ground floor and Level 2 of the Civic Centre.  Most of the items in the ground floor display were generously loaned by Ms Deborah Lennis from her personal collection.  Ms Lennis spent many hours putting the display together including work provided by St Vincent’s Primary School and Croydon Public School students.  Students from the two schools created artworks and gunyah models especially for NAIDOC Week. 

 

                                                       

 

7.      A digital photo frame provided a ‘rolling’ display of images of past and present Ashfield initiatives that had connection to local Aboriginal community.

 

Financial Implications

No financial implications

 

Other Staff Comments

 

Public Consultation

 

Conclusion

Attendance numbers and interest in the initiatives hosted by Ashfield Council during NAIDOC Week demonstrates a community interest in activities that acknowledge and respect Aboriginal heritage.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Attachment 1View

Deborah Lennis article

1 Page

 

Attachment 2View

Inner West Courier 12 July 2012

1 Page

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the Committee note the information contained in this report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nellette Kettle

Director Corporate & Community Services

 


Attachment 1

 

Deborah Lennis article

 


Attachment 2

 

Inner West Courier 12 July 2012

 


Ashfield Council – Report to Aboriginal Consultative Committee held on Thursday 16 August 2012                                                                                                                                                  ACC6.3

Subject                            BUILDING THE SISTER COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIP WITH THE PEAK HILL ABORIGINAL COMMUNITY WORKING PARTY

 

File Ref                            Community Services

 

Prepared by                   Anthia Hart - Community Development Worker - Arts, Culture & Recreation       

 

 

Reasons                          To update the Committee on this initiative

 

Objective                         To progress the Sister Community relationship with the Peak Hill Aboriginal Community Working Party

 

 

 


Overview of Report


The purpose of this report is to provide the Committee with an update on the Sister Community initiative and to provide information to progress the relationship.

 

 

 

Background

The Sister City movement began in 1956, shortly after World War II, by President Eisenhower who proposed a people-to-people citizen diplomacy network in the United States of America. His goal was to involve individuals and organised groups at all levels of society in citizen diplomacy, with the hope that personal relationships, fostered through sister city agreements and county and state affiliations, would lessen the chance of future world conflicts.

A Sister City program enables people to become directly involved in relations in a unique and meaningful way, bringing long-term benefits to the local community and its partners.  Sister City relationships allow communities to exchange ideas, gain a broader perspective and increase their understanding of national and international issues.

The program acts as a springboard and catalyst for knowledge-sharing opportunities, while also promoting tourism and education.  Through cultural, educational and sporting exchanges, the program helps to break down intercultural barriers.  It promotes diversity and encourages openness, tolerance and mutual understanding, all of which will enrich our communities.  In short, the Sister City program provides a host of exciting opportunities with the potential to enhance and add value to our personal and professional lives.

Council has been considering for some time the proposal to establish a Sister Community relationship with the Peak Hill Aboriginal community.  Whilst different to a Sister City arrangement, such an initiative would hold similar aspirations of breaking down intercultural barriers.

The proposal to establish a sister community program with the Aboriginal community of Peak Hill was first presented by Ashfield Council to the Parkes Shire Council in June 2011.  The General Manager of the Parkes Shire Council endorsed the proposal in principle, and in April 2012, Ashfield Mayor, Councillor Lyall Kennedy, Ms Patricia Blackman and Mr Peter Cross travelled to Parkes and Peak Hill to further develop the intention. Parkes Shire Council mediated the initial contact with the Peak Hill Aboriginal Community Working Party.  

More recently, Ms Paula Payne, headmistress of the Peak Hill Central School attended the official opening of the Ashfield Civic Centre activity rooms on 3 July 2012, during NAIDOC Week.  These visits have enabled discussion that will assist in the development of the relationship and agreement between Ashfield Council and the Peak Hill community.

 

To further develop the sister community relationship a formal agreement should outline key areas.  These could be education, culture, trade, tourism and/or sport.  Aims of the Ashfield/Peak Hill relationship could include:

·      to create personal relationships across cultural barriers

·      to provide an opportunity for a broad range of interactions between students, teachers, parents and the community in both areas

·      to facilitate and maintain school to school and community to community involvement

·      to foster current and future ties between Ashfield and Peak Hill to contribute to the personal and cultural enrichment of all involved

·      to promote the relationship through advertising with the local media

·      to develop cultural understanding through long term relationships

Activities to promote the above aims could include:

·      correspondence, emails, video links, face-to-face

·      student exchanges

·      delegation visits

·      other activities (sharing of resources)

No two ‘Sister City’ programs are exactly the same, just as no two communities are the same, the agreement that is reached between the partners will reflect this.  A sample agreement is attached.

Financial Implications

There is no specific Council funding allocation for the Sister Community initiative.


 

Other Staff Comments

 

Public Consultation

Consultation with the Aboriginal Advisory Committee

 

Conclusion

The initiative has progressed to the stage where delegations have visited both communities and there is agreement in principle to further the relationship.  A formal agreement will provide guidelines for future projects.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Attachment 1View

Sample agreement

1 Page

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That the Committee provide feedback on the sample Sister Community agreement contained as an attachment to this report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nellette Kettle

Director Corporate & Community Services

 

 

 


Attachment 1

 

Sample agreement

 

 

 

Sample Agreement

Memorandum of Understanding

Between

Ashfield Council and Peak Hill Aboriginal Community Working Party

Ashfield Council, 260 Liverpool Road Ashfield New South Wales 2131 and Peak Hill Aboriginal Community Working Party, PO Box 42 Peak Hill New South Wales, 2869 agree to become sister communities in order to develop friendship and cooperation between our two communities and promote mutual understanding and cultural awareness.

SISTER COMMUNITY PROGRAM GOALS

·    To strengthen relationships, understanding and appreciation between community members in Ashfield Council area and Peak Hill

·    To increase cultural awareness and respect

·    To develop ties of friendship through regular communication

·    To build a broader perspective within each community

 

SISTER COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES may include:

·    School affiliations that may include exchange of student work, email, letters, photos, student newspapers etc to promote mutual understanding

·    Endeavour to develop student, teacher and administrator exchange programs to provide the opportunity to study, work and live in the sister community

·    Performing/visual art exchanges that may include art/cultural exhibitions in both locations

·    Community development programs such as health, environment, tourism, economic development

·    Business delegations

·    Staff exchange and resource sharing

·    Club or organisational links especially as Rugby League, Cricket, Tennis and Swimming have all been prominent sports in the history of the Ashfield Local Government area

·    Community Service projects

·    Exchange of leadership development information

·    Environmental knowledge exchange aimed at preserving the natural environment in both localities

 

This agreement will be reviewed in 2015 to determine future directions of this agreement.

 

_____________________________                           ________________________________

Mayor, Ashfield Council                                             Chairperson, Peak Hill Aboriginal Community Working Party